Apr 152011
 

Renaissance at the V&A (Victoria & Albert museum), London

Please also consider visiting the ‘Cast Courts’ page (with the separate page for Beatrice d’Este’s tomb), which contains more pictures of (reproduced) Renaissance statues.

Stained and painted glass, late 15th century
From the chapel of the Holy Blood, Bruges, Netherlands
Mary, Duchess of Burgundy (1457-1482), daughter of Charles the Bold and Isabella of Bourbon

A Lady of the Lupari family, about 1515-25
Possibly by Alfonso Lombardi
Italy, Bologna
Terracotta
The bust is life-sized.

Marriage chest (Cassone) with the Meeting of Solomon and the Queen of Sheba, about 1475
Workshop of Apollonio di Giovanni
Italy, Florence
Walnut, carved and gilded, painted in tempera; the lid, feet and gilding of later date
This chest is approximately 2 meters / yards wide and about 1 meter / yard high (with feet).

Marriage chest (Cassone) with the Meeting of Solomon and the Queen of Sheba, 1450-1500
Workshop of Francesco di Giorgo Martini
Italy, Florence
Carved and gilded gesso on wood, painted in tempera; lid and feet of later date.
This chest is approximately 2 meters / yards wide and about 1 meter / yard high (with feet).

Casket with grotesque ornament and Medusa heads, 1500-1510
Italy
White-lead based decoration (pastiglia) with crushed glass
This casket is approximately 20cm (8 inches) wide.

Parade shield with the griffin of the Villani family, about 1450
Gilded and painted gesso on wood, backed with leather
The rare, large shield is big enough to conceal a man’s whole body, but because it was made of wood it was probably carried at public events to display the family’s power. When not in use, it would have hung in the main reception room or sala.

Parade shields, about 1500-20
Wood with lacquered and gilded decoration

Twenty-four floor tiles, about 1500
Italy, Persaro
Tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica)
Since they were hand-painted rather than stamped or molded, these tiles were costly.

Six floor tiles, about 1492-94
Possibly by the workshop of Antonio dei Fidelli
These tiles may have been among those laid in Isabella d’Este’s study to stop mice nesting beneath the floorboards.

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